Labdanum- Beard grooming Babylonian Style

Labdanum-Beard Grooming Babylonian style

 

Labdanum and Babylonian Beards
Babylonian Beard

 

Labdanum. Also called LadanumCistus or Rockrose, is a fragrant mediterranean shrub, rich in history, oleo-resin, and tradition, both medicinally and aromatically.

Cistus ladanifer #1
Cistus ladanifer #1 (Photo credit: J.G. in S.F.)

 

The use of Labdanum, Cistus Ladanifera, Cistus Incanus or Cistus Creticus from Crete, has been traced back thousands of years to ancient Egypt, the civilizations of Akkad, Sumeria, Babylon. It is believed to be one of the ingredients in the ancient Hebrews sacred temple incense, “K’toret”. Thus keeping privileged company with such esteemed fragrant oleo-resins as Frankincense, Myrrh and Balm of Gilead

Labdanum is the starting material for most, if not all “Amber” type scents. Since there is no naturally occurring material with this name and fragrance. If you come across anything purported to be “True Amber”, be aware it is a composite material.

Cistis creticus (Cistus) source of traditional Cretan Labdanum

 

The fragrance of Labdanum is musky, warm, masculine, mysterious, balsamic, woody, slightly spicy and sweet. It is a heady odour, rich, complex and long-lasting. To me it speaks of mystery and masculinity. Not aggressive or self-serving masculinity, as Mars’ energy can be at times, but the powerful and gentle, nourishing strength of  the Sun. The kind of warm masculinity I associate with wisdom, compassion, love and healing. Labdanum speaks to me of the mystery and magic that we, the not so fair sex, are bestowed with. The receptive side that most men often do not discover till later in life.

 

English: Adam and Eve
English: Adam and Eve (Photo credit: Wikipedia

 

Yes, men have a mystery too, an intuitive and sensitive side, a perspective and insight that only men can have. One of equal weight, but less obvious as the better known womanly mysteries. For in this reality of duality, there could not be one without the other. Nor can we respect and honour one without accepting the other as its equal and counterpoint . It can work no other way. Yin and Yang. It is a gift that all men can draw upon.

 

 

 

One symbol of masculinity that cannot be refuted is A beard.  They say a man’s beard covers his throat area, the seat of his emotions and vulnerability, hiding and protecting them. I can’t disagree. It certainly feels necessary at times. Believe it or not, it’s not easy being a man in our society.  But we also embrace and  care for our masculine nature by growing and grooming our facial hair.

 

Sumerian-Babylonian-Beard

 

My personal favourite beard dressing ingredient is, you guessed it, Labdanum. It has a warm comforting and familiar scent to it, as if carried through lifetimes and centuries, adhered to our spirits.  It does have an ancient and timeless quality to it, and as mentioned, it is persistent!             Persistent enough to stick to our memory and genes 2000, 3000 or 5000 years later?  Apparently.

Assyrian composite man/horse/bird with beard
Assyrian composite man/horse/bird with beard

Labdanum, as other oleo-resins, has an affinity with facial hair. If anyone has read my earlier post about mustaches, Waxing warmly over mustaches, or a recipe for solid mustache wax, you will know I find oleo-resins a great aid in training facial hair. I have not researched the chemistry of this effect, but the resin part seems to have chemical compounds that affect hair behaviour. Labdanum works just as well as Pine, Spruce and Fir saps in this regard. It helps shape my beard, training it to hold a form long after the Labdanum has gone from my face. It helps with stray hairs, cowlicks and in general keeps things in place without the use of extra waxes and gels. And of course, the warm Amber like scent that Labdanum imparts to my facial hair is reason enough to slather it on regularly.

 

Mesoporamian relief
Mesopotamian relief

Traditionally Labdanum was collected from the beards and thighs of sheep and goats. The animals would accumulate sticky gobs of resin on their wool as they rubbed against the plants while grazing. If anyone is familiar with the musky fragrance of goats, or the gentler odor of raw Lanolin, (from sheep’s wool), they may have an idea what a good match these animal essences can be to Labdanum.There is a wonderful muskiness to these smells that compliments the sweet woody balsamic notes of Labdanum. For this reason I often use Lanolin as a conditioning agent in my Labdanum based beard grooming products. When fragrance and function of materials work together naturally, it is always a joy.

 cretan goats, collect Labdanum as they brush against against Cistus while grazing

 

Nowadays Labdanum is either collected by thrashing the plants with an ancient tool called a Ladanesterion, (There are records of its use in the first century A.D.), or by harvesting the shrub and boiling it in water, often a water and alkaloid mixture. The separated residue is then processed with solvents to create resinoids, an absolute and eventually an essential oil. There are different grades of quality depending on which type of Cistus is used, where, when and how it is harvested, the methods of separation and extraction used. Gentler solvents and lower temperatures are of course preferred when a high quality perfume ingredient is required.

When one comes upon photographs of sculptures of ancient Mesopotamian kings and gods, or Akkadian, Babylonian, Sumerian and Assyrian men, we gaze upon some very ornate and stylized beards carved in stone reliefs and sculptures, steles and rock walls thousands of years ago. Sadly, very few of these magnificent representations of Mesopotamic masculinity remain intact. If they haven’t been defaced by conquering armies, then  religious zealots finished the job in their attempts to eradicate idolatry and any competition with their own gods and dogma. Maybe they were pissed off that someone else’s god had a more magnificent beard than their god.

..Stylized Babylonian beard

When I come across references that ancient Egyptian and Mesopotamian figures may have pasted Labdanum soaked, sheep’s, (or goat’s), wool on their faces as part of their facial hair grooming methods, I always feel it is too tempting to underestimate  the sophistication of our ancestors and misinterpret the visual references carved in the ancient stone. These people were not as primitive as we like to assume. Labdanum, in my experience, is an ideal facial hair styling and grooming gift from nature, on its own or when combined with oils, waxes or resins.  When one learns of the elaborate beard grooming and shaping techniques employed in ancient Mesopotamian cultures, such as tying strings or ribbons, using hot  irons, curling and braiding a beard, weaving in beads and precious metals, dyeing the hair with henna or other coloring agents, and of course applying sweet smelling unguents to it,  it makes me question whether sticking patches of sheep’s wool on ones face would complement any of these techniques or grooming methods, or if it would be completely at odds with it.

Presumed to be a stone relief of a "Genie" performing blessings and sprinkling "Holy", fragrant water, (Labdanum and other odiferous materials??).
Presumed to be a stone relief of a “Genie” performing blessings and sprinkling “Holy”, or fragrant water, (Labdanum and other odiferous materials??).

 

 

 

On the other hand, incorporating fragrant resins and oils, especially those that would help with shaping and setting a beard, does seem a more likely complement to the established grooming practices of the times. In my mind, Labdanum would be a perfect aromatic accompaniment to all that beard training, styling, preening and fussing. Just as effective then as it is today.

 

That’s my take on it.   Whatever methods you use to groom and shape your facial hair, they are part of your own unique path of self-expression. If you want to explore making your own beard or mustache grooming products, have fun, and remember to always take notes! Your future self will thank you.

If you have any questions, comments, insights or suggestions, I would love to hear from you..

Dan

 

 

 

 

 

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http://archaeologistforhire.wordpress.com/2010/02/08/the-archaeology-of-beards/

 

 

 

 

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6 Comments

  1. Very interesting background on this resin, Dan. So, do you think a piece of resin in a warm bath of jojoba oil will, as you say, yield itself? Having no beard and just a bit of a femme-stache (which I wax assiduously) I am wondering if there is a medicinal use for such an oil in addition to its usefulness as a base note for fragrances. I am also an amateur spinner and wonder if a very light touch of this might tame the “fuzz” of my alpaca rug-type yarn, which I actually use more for beaded jewelry than for weaving or knitting. My pieces tend to look downright hairy and it might also be nice to add a bit of scent that would emanate with body heat. Thoughts?

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    1. Hi Denise.
      Nice seeing you here.
      Yes a warm bath and perhaps standing together for 4 -to 6 weeks like a tincture will dissolve the resin and the essential oils of the Labdanum into your carrier oil.
      The raw resin should bind your stray fibers nicely and yes, could definitely release it’s scent when warmed by the skin. Lovely ideas for applications!! I know there are some traditional mediicinal uses for Labdanum resin but they escape me now. I’m sure a bit of digging online will reveal more than I have forgotten.

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  2. Interesting and enlightening and also heartfelt. I have always been fascinated with the beards of the men represented in Sumerian statues but would like to see an example on a modern day real-world beard. What is going on exactly with the styling and layering portrayed in the statues? Braids? Beads? Any links to photos would be great. Great website Dan, I’m glad I stumbled upon it. Cheers, Mat

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    1. Thank you Matt! Though the beards seen in their art were highly stylized, I uderstand archeological digs have uncovered a range of tools and ornaments used to braid, set and ornament facal hair in the graves of both rulers and common men of the times.
      I recall reading of unguent pots, combs, beads and lengths of wire and string that were assumed to serve in nightly rituals of beard setting and grooming. That said, I will have to dig up those articles………..

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  3. Hi Dan, great article! How can you incorporate labdanum(raw resin) in amoustache or beard wax? Just like you show in your other recipes with resins?Greetings from Crete

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    1. Hi Emmanouil.
      Thank you for visiting.
      Lucky you, living in Crete among the most precious and fragrant of the Cistus family!!!
      I am going to say yes to your question, and that the natural and unprocessed Labdanum oleoresin resin will yield itself to warm oils and alcohol.
      I am expecting a small shipment of your local Labdanum and this is likely the very first thing I will do with it.
      It should be an enchanting addition to a beard or moustache wax. Labdanum brings a special combination of comfort, mystery and seduction that is hard to beat. I can’t wait!

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