I have finally put together an Animalic/Musk sampler. The interest in animal-sourced musk samples has grown steadily in the shop and the release of this new product is a perfect opportunity to continue my discourse on the ethical issues inherent in Civet and other animal musks and what we can do to facilitate better stewardship […]

Whole resin chunks of Boswellia Serrata in the sieve. No need to grind the resin or prep it in any way. Boswellia Serrata, B. carterii, B. Sacra and B. Papyrifera all contain a high percent of Boswellic acids. As many of you know, Boswellic acids have proven to be anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer in laboratory studies and are likely the main compounds that led to Frankincense’s long traditional use as medicine. There are no Boswellic acids in the essential oil of frankincense.

When it comes to fungi, Myrrh can be used to address a variety of conditions. In a saline mouthwash, the tincture of Myrrh is used for thrush, (oral candidiasis), in a tea, via infusion or tincture it helps treat candida and other fungi in the digestive tract, as a 1:5-96% alcohol tincture it is a treatment for Tinea type fungal infections such as “Ringworm”, (not a worm, but a colony of Fungi), Athletes foot and “Jock itch”, caused by various dermatophytes, fungi/molds that feed off dead skin cells on moist areas of the skin. Less known, but equally effective, Myrrh oleoresin is used in the preparation of a nail “Laquer” which is applied to toe and fingernail fungal infections, or onychomycosis, (which means nail fungus growth, infestation or proliferation in Latin).

How to isolate the resin and Boswellic acids from select Frankincense oleoresins with water Lately, we have been hearing a lot about the anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer compounds found in the frankincense family. The most publicized recently are the Boswellic acids and AKBA, or acetyl-keto-beta-boswellic acid,  pentacyclic triterpenes found in some species of Frankincense which make […]